Brisket Instructions

Discussion in 'Orangebloods.com's Classics' started by Herman2Texas, Jun 29, 2014.

  1. Herman2Texas

    Herman2Texas Wildlife Biologist
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    Alright all you brisket gurus I could use some advice on my first brisket for the 4th of July. Sorry for another of these threads but I couldn't find any other than Such's brisket post. I was going to just use salt and pepper to season the brisket but was wondering if any of you have any other seasoning advice. A friend has a gas smoker (I believe) that you use wood chips(wet) to smoke the meat. As far as heat for a 10 lb piece of meat am I right to think 150 for 8 hours? Then wrap it in foil for 2 hours and crank up the heat to 200? Any help from the brisket masters would be greatly appreciated!!! Sorry for my ignorance
     
  2. dianaprince

    dianaprince ༼ つ ◕_◕ ༽つ
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    Joeywa to the rescue.....
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com[/URL]
     
  3. zrile9

    zrile9 Well-Known Member
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    Go get Adkins western style barbeque seasoning. Put a ton of it the day before ( make sure it's not sitting in blood overnight, drain that off) You can find it just about anywhere. Smoke it at 225 for about 4 hours then another 4-5 wrapped or until done. Don't use time, go with internal temperature, touch or last resort...look. As far as the wrap I put dr pepper, bbq sauce, Lipton beefy onion powder, hidden valley ranch powder and easy garlic. Thank me later ;)
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com[/URL]
     
  4. Herman2Texas

    Herman2Texas Wildlife Biologist
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    What should the internal temp be when I wrap it? 150? I
     
  5. BurntOrangeBassAssassin

    BurntOrangeBassAssassin Well-Known Member
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    Just cook it at 225-250 until the internal temp hits 195 or so. Then pull it and let it rest for a couple of hours.
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com[/URL]
     
  6. rendavis25

    rendavis25 Well-Known Member
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    I used to shoot for 195 and seemed like I had to go to inferno temps in the pit to reach it at the end and it would often be dry. Started pulling mine off at 185 now and they're awesome.
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com[/URL]
     
  7. morrisbuttermaker12

    morrisbuttermaker12 Well-Known Member
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    WTF
     
  8. BurntOrangeBassAssassin

    BurntOrangeBassAssassin Well-Known Member
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    Yeah, it isn't a science. A lot of "depends" in smoking a brisket.

    LMAO @ zrile.
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com[/URL]
     
  9. txhornsba

    txhornsba Well-Known Member
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    Your thermometer could be broken, too. Fork test works when thermometer fails.
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com[/URL]
     
  10. zrile9

    zrile9 Well-Known Member
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    Laugh all you want boys and girls. I took a class some time ago taught by a guy that's won several bbq competitions (and his "students have won a few 1st and 2nd places across the state) and that's his recipe. I use it every time and everyone loves it but hey stick to your rub, I'm sure it's great.
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com[/URL]
     
  11. RLong68

    RLong68 Well-Known Member
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    Not sure getting the pit temp to 200 requires "cranking up" the heat. No reason at all to be smoking at 150 for 8 hours. You'll still have a helluva long way to go.
     
  12. uthenley

    uthenley Well-Known Member
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    Look at brining it beforehand. Once I heard about that, I've never done it any other way since. I've never bothered trying to come up with my own rub. I load up on the Stubb's Beef rub with molasses and coffee in it. Sounds questionable, but it has, by far, been the best received of the briskets I've done. Love that stuff. I like to keep my briskets at about 10 lbs. No real science I guess, just seems to be where I get the best results. Try to keep your pit around 225 degrees and smoke it to an internal temp of 150-160. Wrap it in butcher paper and let if go until 195-205. At that point I let it rest for at least an hour inside the vertical chamber or wrapped in a towel inside a cooler.

    Get you one of these to make your life MUCH easier

    These are nice also

    This is something worth using also
     
  13. TheAngryHammer

    TheAngryHammer Would you say I have a plethora of piñatas?
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    You forgot to tell him about the Liquid Smoke.
     
  14. morrisbuttermaker12

    morrisbuttermaker12 Well-Known Member
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    Who taught the class?
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com[/URL]
     
  15. sendero95

    sendero95 Irregardless is a word
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    In case some of you missed it, Ranch dressing showed up in this thread!
     
  16. jmb99000

    jmb99000 The Renaissance Man
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    Hey man, I'd recommend you watch these two BBQ with Franklin vids. They are helpful. The variables are quality of meat, rub, your smoker, wood, constant temp, do you wrap in foil or use butcher paper, etc. It's an experiment and learning experience that you will tweak over time to get it how you like it. Good luck.

    http://youtu.be/VmTzdMHu5KU
    http://youtu.be/sMIlyzRFUjU
     
  17. AngryCorgi

    AngryCorgi Well-Known Member
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    Ranch Dressing = what to put on your brisket if you've screwed up and need to hide the shittiness of your meat.
     
  18. AngryCorgi

    AngryCorgi Well-Known Member
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    As far as smoking it for 8 hours, if you take a cold brisket and throw it in your smoker, it will only take smoke for a couple hours at the most. Beyond that, you aren't giving it anymore smoke flavor. It's really important to get the meat cold (obviously not frozen) to maximize the amount of smoke the brisket will take. Starting with room-temperature brisket will result in less smoke taken in by the brisket. So most of your cooking can happen in an oven, for all it matters, as long as the first couple of hours it was smoked.
     
  19. Craben

    Craben Well-Known Member
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    How does a cold piece of meat abosb more smoke flavor than a warmer one?
     
  20. discostu007

    discostu007 life-long Warriors fan since 7/4/16
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    Use the internal temperature as a guideline, not the rule. When it gets to at least 185, open up the smoker and check it out. A meat probe should be able to slide in and out effortlessly. Also, you should get some pretty good jiggle out of the brisket if you give it a light shake. You are looking for tenderness, and want to ensure that the fat in the brisket has melted. That won't happen until you hit at least 180-185.

    As for wrapping in foil, you are effectively steaming the brisket at that point. I am not saying there is anything wrong with that, but people call foil the "Texas Crutch" for a reason. When the brisket is done to your liking, do not pull it off and start slicing immediately. Plan accordingly to be able to let it rest for a few hours before serving. Wrap the brisket in foil, wrap again in a towel, and place in a dry cooler. It will keep warm for hours and you will allow the juices to redistribute in the brisket.
     
  21. AngryCorgi

    AngryCorgi Well-Known Member
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    Wikipedia is your pal: The Science of Smoke!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    While the example of frozen meat versus cold meat shows frozen meat absorbs more because it stays colder in the smoker longer, I wouldn't freeze a brisket before smoking it. Freezing things tends to cause molecular changes due to ice crystal formation that also affects texture. So, As close to 32F without causing crystal formation. A freind of mine that makes amazingly smokey briskets says the smoke intake, he believes, has to do with how the grain of the meat swells up as it heats and disallows much of the extra smoke. Smoking more than a couple hours might add a tiny bit more smoke, but its not anything you'll notice. My friend's briskets are amazing purely due to the rich mesquite flavor. He adds a very modest dry rub to it, but the key to how good it is has to do with the 3/4" smoke ring that surrounds the beef.





    This post was edited on 6/30 11:19 AM by AngryCorgi
     
  22. Herman2Texas

    Herman2Texas Wildlife Biologist
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    Thanks for all of the advice guys! I will definitely post some pics of the before and after so that y'all can judge how I did.
     
  23. sendero95

    sendero95 Irregardless is a word
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    Definitely let us know how the Hidden Valley brisket turns out!
     
  24. TexicanTone

    TexicanTone Open the door, Rosie!
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    Sprinkle the brisket on both sides with salt and coarsely ground black pepper. Combine 1/4 cup of Worcestershire sauce and 1/4 cup of water in a mister.

    Your smoker is ready when the temperature is between 275 and 300 degrees F.
    Put the brisket in the smoker on the cool side of the grate and close the lid. Cook for 6 hours, adding wood as needed to keep the fire burning evenly. At this point, test the brisket with an instant-read thermometer; the internal temperature should be 165 degrees F.

    Remove the brisket from the smoker, Spray it with some of the Worcestershire solution (there will be a lot left over), wrap it in butcher paper, and return it to the smoker. Let it cook in the paper for 2 hours longer.
    Remove the warpped brisket from the smoker and place it in an empty cooler or a 200 degree F oven for 3 or 4 hours. The brisket is done when a toothpick passes effortlessly through the fat or an instant-read thermometer inserted into the center registers at least 185 degrees F (but preferably as high as 203 degrees F).

    To ensure the brisket remains moist, do not trim away the fat cap before serving. Slice only as much brisket as needed and serve immediately.
     
  25. LONGHORNREALTOR

    LONGHORNREALTOR Well-Known Member
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    Corgi with the answer to all the

    BRING THE MEAT TO ROOM TEMP boneheads

    You'll still get the guy who says you and science is wrong

    and as for the ranch dressing, you forgot the liquid smoke and the italian dressing marinade before the ranch dressing rub...funny how the best BBQ in the US and Myron Mixon only use salt and pepper for a rub....so who taught this class??
     
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  26. AngryCorgi

    AngryCorgi Well-Known Member
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    I agree. Salt and Pepper (or maybe something a little spicier if you like) are pretty much all you need. You don't want to take away from the smoke flavor with overpowering flavors like ranch dressing mix or dr pepper or mr pibb or whatever bat-shit-crazy solution some guy on the interwebz came up with one night when he was drunk. The only logical reason to add the other things is that you can't make the mesquite smoke to take, which means you are doing something wrong at a very basic level.
     
  27. 1stB12Champs

    1stB12Champs Well-Known Member
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    Salt
    Pepper
    Time
    constant heat
    good cut of meat
    leave it alone

    The one trick IMO is that you can use all the fancy thermometers, etc to tell you when it is done, and they are all almost always wrong. They tell you the temperature, but they do not tell you when it is done. Back when I was learning I would smoke it to about 190 temp on my thermometer, and they were almost always not quite broken down, and tender. They were "cooked", but they were not "done". that is a trick that comes with experience. Otherwise its a very keep it simple stupid process. The rub is not going to make any difference honestly. It all carmerlizes and ends up all basically tasting the same. Use salt and pepper. It is cheap, and doesn't add any funky flavor when smoked like some rubs can. I would add if you are worried about tenderness, temp control, etc you might consider injecting the brisket with beef stock before cooking. it will keep it more moist.
     
  28. AngryCorgi

    AngryCorgi Well-Known Member
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    Never tried it myself, but I've heard that if you want to try to REALLY soak the meat with smoke, you need to have some sort of brush or mop or something with cold water or such and every 15 minutes or so you need apply that cool liquid to the meat. This should, in theory, keep the meat on one side cooler and allow more smoke uptake. I can't speak from personal experience on whether this actually helps or not, though. Logic suggests it *should* though. Dunno how it will affect the topical seasoning of your meat. If you try it, you may want to apply the cooling liquid gently so as to not erode the spices.

    This post was edited on 6/30 1:03 PM by AngryCorgi
     
  29. Herman2Texas

    Herman2Texas Wildlife Biologist
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    Anyone ever tried Pecan wood? We smoke our elk sausage in that and it's DELICIOUS!
     
  30. Suchomel

    Suchomel Well-Known Member
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    Last week I did my first brisket using a USDA select cut. They have USDA prime at HEB for twice the price. Doing another brisket this Friday for a bunch of people.

    Has anyone ever tried a prime cut on a brisket? Is it noticeably different than the select?
     
  31. sendero95

    sendero95 Irregardless is a word
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    Shape and consistent thickness across the cut being held equal, there is between select and prime but not much between prime and choice. I'd split the difference and go choice. JMO.
     
  32. Suchomel

    Suchomel Well-Known Member
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    Any ideas on where I can find a choice? Only have select and prime at the HEB by me. They do have the HEB natural (I've always liked those steaks) but it's already trimmed so I'm staying away from that.
     
  33. sendero95

    sendero95 Irregardless is a word
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    Might have to call around. I'm in Houston and usually get mine at Costco or Central Market. Honestly, if I find a prime I really like I buy it. The time and effort that goes into the process justifies it in my book. LHR and others should be able to stir you to Austin locations for Choice.
     
  34. uthenley

    uthenley Well-Known Member
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    Jason, every one I've done has been pre-trimmed except for maybe 1 or 2. Haven't had a problem with it ever. I'm assuming it's from the brining, but I've done some up to 18 hours and still had juice standing in the butcher paper. Never had any problems drying out up to this point. If you see a good one you like already trimmed, I would get it and try it out. I actually prefer them pre-trimmed for the most part anymore.
     
  35. LONGHORNREALTOR

    LONGHORNREALTOR Well-Known Member
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    Brining definitely makes a difference...
    Personally don't cook a brisket or pork without Sweetwater Spice Brines
    Just a insurance policy especially when Im using the trailer rig that is usually hotter than the smaller offsets.
    But I simply can't do a trimmed brisket, fat=flavor, and there is no getting around that
    Theres a small butcher shop in the backwater side of Liberty Hill that has some great briskets and steaks

    I have cooked select and choice and can't tell the difference
     
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  36. kmclain3

    kmclain3 Well-Known Member
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    I use pecan on brisket almost every time.
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com[/URL]
     
  37. LonghornCPA82

    LonghornCPA82 Certified Pitmaster and Financial Consultant
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    What is the purpose of the towel? If you wrap in foil and/or paper and put it in a dry cooler, why the towel!
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com[/URL]
     
  38. BurntOrangeBassAssassin

    BurntOrangeBassAssassin Well-Known Member
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    I only use pecan. All other woods are for poors.
     
  39. AngryCorgi

    AngryCorgi Well-Known Member
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    Pecan is good, but its much milder than Mesquite. I like to really taste the smoke!
     
  40. Great Hills Horn

    Great Hills Horn Well-Known Member
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    Central Market has choice briskets.
    This post was edited on 6/30 3:04 PM by Great Hills Horn
     

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