High Heat Brisket (Results With Pics)

Discussion in 'Orangebloods.com's Classics' started by C-West, Jun 19, 2011.

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  1. C-West

    C-West Well-Known Member
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    I've always been a low and slow guy with my brisket but thought I'd give the high heat method a try just to see what all the fuss is about. Anything I should know before getting started? I've already brined it in Cali's smoked habanero for 24 hours, taken it out and applied a dry rub to it.

    I'm a traditionalist, but if this comes out better than my low temp ones, it'll be hard to go back.

    [​IMG]
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com
    This post was edited on 6/19 9:00 PM by C-West
     
  2. Armadillo Slim

    Armadillo Slim Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    what is the high heat method again?

    please report back on the results. i am very skeptical that high heat will result in a brisket that is as tender as low and slow, but would sure like to hear how it turns out.
     
  3. Sixth Street

    Sixth Street I have the day off
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    I'll never go low and slow again. I cook mine at 275+.
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com[/URL]
     
  4. C-West

    C-West Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    Slim - it's basically cooking them at a higher heat in half the time and finishing them in foil. I was skeptical but I've watched a few shows recently where pitmasters have actually won championships with this method over low and slow teams. Here's a link that explains it a little but there are a lot of things out there if you google it.
    This post was edited on 6/19 12:07 PM by C-West

    High Heat Method
     
  5. Armadillo Slim

    Armadillo Slim Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    sounds interesting. thanks. let us know how it turns out. i prefer the "moist" side of the brisket instead of the lean side, so i'm particularly interested in how that part turns out.
     
  6. Sixth Street

    Sixth Street I have the day off
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    Slim, I was skeptical, too. If the moist side was compromised at all I would never have stuck with the fast method. But it isn't. In fact its much more consistently moist from brisket to brisket in my experience.
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com[/URL]
     
  7. Armadillo Slim

    Armadillo Slim Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    i'll have to give it a try next weekend. 5 hours is definitely a plus.
     
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  8. LONGHORNREALTOR

    LONGHORNREALTOR Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    As long as I have brine a good amount of time I don't worry

    I cook at 275 to 300...for a hot and fast cook, I honestly can't tell a huge difference other than the fact that we eat much quicker

    Make sure you have plenty of smoke and let her rip..keep a close eye on the temps in the flat, and I usually go with the fork method of doneness after I hit 190 in the transition part of the brisket..also on hot and fast briskets I usually choose a brisket with a ton of fat on the outside and don't trim am single bit of fat off of the meat prior to cooking

    I have a hard time cooking in the Masterbuilt at less than 275 now..if I'm using the offset..I don't mind the low and slow
     
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  9. staceman

    staceman Saving the world...1 client at a time!
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    My dad competes and they go fairly hot too...but he injects the with a ton moisture first
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com[/URL]
     
  10. C-West

    C-West Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    I've had it on for about 45 minutes. Won't mess with it until it reaches 170, then I'll wrap loosely in foil and cook it until ready. Looks good so far.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. tecohorn

    tecohorn Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    I have always combined both methods to get mega bark... That's what my friends call it anyway....
     
  12. GoodOldBill10

    GoodOldBill10 Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    What does that mean "injects with a ton of moisture firs" sorry if that is a stupid question but I'm learning K
     
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  13. GoodOldBill10

    GoodOldBill10 Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    tec bark is my fovorite part btw
     
  14. C-West

    C-West Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    Probably just means that he injects his meat with marinade or brine as opposed to just letting it absorb naturally.

    Meat is naturally salty, so part of the idea behind the brine is that it's a saltier solution than the meat so it literally gets "sucked" into the meat. If you want to have another type of marinade that is less salty truly get to all parts of the meat then you might have to inject it. I'm assuming that's what the poster was talking about.

    Also, if you don't have time to brine it, injection is a great compromise.
     
  15. pantless wonder

    pantless wonder Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    which part do you do first? start on low heat or on high heat?
     
  16. East Mall

    East Mall Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    Where in South Austin can I get Cali's brine? Rec's on what flavors & how to apply would be awesome. Trying to learn how to cook without foil.
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com[/URL]
     
  17. C-West

    C-West Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    I think most Whole Foods carry them. I just moved to Austin and go to the one in the Arboretum but have been really dissapointed with the flavor selection. The Whole Foods in Houston had almost every flavor Cali puts out. The one I'm going to here has only had two flavors (Smoked Habanero and Citrus Brine) for the last month. I need to find a new place up north if anyone has any suggestions.

    As far as flavors... it depends on what you're smoking. The Apple Chipotle is my favorite for pork and chicken. Smoked Habanero is a close second but be careful on how long you brine it for because it can overpower white meat. The brisket bath is the all around winner. You can probably use it with anything and it'll turn out well. All his flavors are good though.

    As far as brining time, that's also up to preference but he's got a pretty good guide on the back of each bottle. I brine almost everything overnight. If it's a big piece of meat like a brisket, I'll do it for 24 hours. The best part about the brines though is it's very hard to screw it up.
     
  18. BurntOrangeBassAssassin

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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    I'll never use the habanero on a brisket again. Last time I did the brisket was so hot that half the guests couldn't eat it. It's great on ribs. Good luck. I do mine hot sometimes too. Never had an issue with moistness or tenderness.
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com[/URL]
     
  19. staceman

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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    Yes, thanks for the clarification, posted quickly while directing at church this morning....they inject the marinade into the meat to keep the moisture.
     
  20. C-West

    C-West Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    Yeah, I'm afraid of that. As I stated above, the Whole Foods next to my house has a weak selection and it was either that or the Turkey brine. I normally use his Brisket Bath. Fortunately though, my wife and I are the only ones that will be chowing down on this and we love spicy stuff. Guess we'll find out...
     
  21. tecohorn

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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    10-12 lbs..

    High heat (375-400) for first hour with fairly good smoke...

    225 wrapped for 5 hours of so.. 165-170 internal temp.. smoke don't matter much since it's wrapped in foil..

    Finish at high heat unwrapped for hour or so with light smoke...

    Let sit off heat for 20-30 minutes then cut it up..

    !!Every pit and brisket is a little different.. You have to dail in your own pit..!! I have a giant pit (9feet X 3Feet) a medium pit (3feet x 2.5 feet) and a small pit (2 x 2 feet).... They are all differnt but still fairly close..

    You also need those BBQ gloves to make handling the meat a breeze.. They are pretty cheap..
     
  22. C-West

    C-West Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    Just hit 170 degrees after about 2 1/2 hours at 350. Just wrapped it in foil

    [​IMG]
     
  23. joeywa

    joeywa Unofficial BBQ Consultant & Baseball Ambassador
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    Looks good C-West. Make sure to post pics after you take it off the grill & slice it.
    Posted from wireless.rivals.com[/URL]
     
  24. ccatcher15

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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    My dad won the Jack Daniels invitational cooking a brisket at 300+, he actually got a perfect score on his brisket.
     
  25. MR. COSELL

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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    Everybody should pslost what they know about bbq and the high heat method and the mods should ARCHIVE this thread with the other bbq thread.
     
  26. C-West

    C-West Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    Here's the method I'm following. The guy on this forum had a great post. Chances are, he's probably an OB member based on his avatar for that site.

    Method

    **Summary

    - Prepare brisket, trimming fat a little more than usual.
    - Apply a wet rub followed by a dry.
    - Fire the WSM using the Minion method, with 3/4 of a chimney of charcoal and all smoke wood on top.
    - Put the brisket on as the WSM is heating up. Target a lid temperature of 325 to 350.
    - Flip the door and crack it open as an additional air source if needed to get the temperature up.
    - Cook the brisket to an internal temperature of about 170, just past plateau.
    - Foil the brisket loosely, but with a tight crimp. If you are removing the point, do that now, and don't foil the point.
    - Continue to cook, but not by temperature. Remove the meat when the flat is just probe tender.
    - Remove brisket from foil and carefully reserve all liquid.
    - If you are firming the bark, return the meat to the smoker, directly on the grate for 30 minutes.
    - Rewrap in new foil, adding about 1 1/2 cups of reserved liquid to the flat, and rest in towels in a cooler for 30 min to 3 hours.

    **Select and Trim Brisket

    Note: if you are well organized, you can fire up the chimney for the WSM before trimming and applying the rubs. Or between trimming and applying the rubs.

    This method can be used on just the flat, but most folks seem to be doing whole packers. This method most commonly recommended for Select and no-roll (ungraded) briskets since they don't have the marbling that Choice or other higher end branded briskets do. Traditional low and slow is still recommended for these higher end briskets.

    Trim the fat from a packer a little more than usual. Keep the fat cap trimmed to about 1/4 inch, but don't remove it. The brisket will be cooked fat-side down to protect the meat from the higher heat. The reason for the higher trim is that the shorter cooking time will not allow it to render down like it does when cooked low/slow.

    **Prepare and Apply Rubs

    Because the brisket is finished in foil, you won't get a hard bark. There are two levels of technique for dealing with this. First, use a wet paste rub followed by a dry rub for all high heat method briskets. The paste will set up and be similar to bark, but will be a bit moist. Second, if you want to try for a drier, more traditional bark, return the brisket to the smoker uncovered for the last 30 minutes in order to firm up the outside.

    For Kevin's Paste Rub, use a blender to puree all the ingredients except the oil until very smooth. Then, with the machine running, add the oil in a slow stream. The paste recipe is enough to cover a whole 12-14-pound packer with the exception of the fatcap side.

    For Kevin's Dry Rub, Using your spice grinder of choice, combine all ingredients and grind together. If some or any of the spices are in whole form (cloves, fennel, coriander, cardamom seeds, white peppercorns, black peppercorns), toast them, if desired, in a dry pan heated over high heat stirring constantly, until very fragrant, about 1 min. The dry recipe will make more than you need.

    Craig Castille's paste rub is also shown.

    If you plan to separate the point, you can insert a toothpick into the fat seam between the flat and point as a marker before you put on the rub . This will give you an idea where they join when it's time to seperate them.

    Apply your paste with the back of a soup spoon to the brisket and spread it fairly evenly. Sprinkle the rub over the paste lightly, wait a few minutes, then sprinkle on more rub, as desired.

    **Fire-Up The Cooker

    Use an empty water pan. The water in a water pan is a heat sink, and does not add moisture to the meat. Since water boils at 212, using water as a sink will tend to hinder your ability to get the cooker to the mid 300s needed for the high heat method. Instead of water as a heat sink, use a 14" pottery flower pot base. The flowerpot base should just fit on top of your water pan. The empty water pan acts as an air insulator to prevent the flowerpot base from getting so hot it will burn the drippings and the water pan also supports the flowerpot base more securely than trying to hang the pottery off the tabs all by itself. Some folks recommend putting sand in the base before foiling to add additional mass and thus a larger heat sink. Line both the pan and pottery base with foil to make cleanup easier, to catch the drippings, and to keep fats from absorbing into the pottery.

    Light the cooker using the Minion Method. Open all vents. Start with a full ring of briquettes. Don't skimp on the charcoal. If you end up with more fuel than needed, you can shut down the cooker after removing the meat to preserve the remaining coal for a future cook. Top with your smoke wood. Because the cook is faster, and since you will foil for the end, you want all of the smoke wood on top. This allows it to be consumed and add its flavor before foiling. Light a 3/4 filled chimney of briquettes spread them over the unlit briquettes and smoke wood chunks. Then wait until the ring feels real hot before assembling the unit (probably around 15 minutes). Expect it to take an hour or so to come up to the cook temperature.

    High heat cooking is between 325 and 350 on the lid. To get to this temperature with the Minion method, you may need more air than the vents allow. Flipping the door upside down (so the knob is on the bottom) and propping it open 1/2 to 1 inch is usually all you need to boost temps. Use a piece of split wood to adjust the opening of the door. Unless the smoker is sitting in the direct sun light, expect to have to prop the door open. Sometimes the door stays propped open the entire cook. It ususally settles around 325-335 lid for the duration.

    **Barbeque the Brisket

    If you can time it such that the meat is going on as the Minion start is beginning, you can achieve a better smoke ring. Figure a packer taking 4-4.5 hours by this method.

    Put the brisket on the grate fat side down. The fat layer helps protect the meat from the higher radiant heat. Cook until a probe inserted from the side into the flat reads 160 to 170 or so. This should be through he plateau.

    Now remove the brisket to foil it. If you are going to separate the point, now is the time. The point can be cooked unfoiled on the grate next to the foiled flat to make outstanding burnt ends. Foil the brisket (or flat), fat cap UP, tenting and leaving room, but making sure it is crimped together tightly. The brisket will throw off a good deal of liquid. Having room around and above it will contain the liquid but lessen the pressure on the foil.

    As an alternative to HD foil, consider a foil pan. These come in an 18" x 12" x 3" oval size that is an excellent fit on a WSM 18.5. Then foil over the brisket in the pan. This will allow much easier access for probing for doneness, and will make physically managing the liquid easier and safer.

    Once foiled, use the probe to determine when the brisket is done, but NOT by temperature. Just prove vertically Abandon any notion of a targeted finish temperature. Especially because a foiled brisket will give artificially high temperatures. When the brisket hits the low 190s cook at the clock. If it's been over 90 min since you foiled but not quite 2 hours you'll likely need more time, 30-45 min, but check the brisket. Don't move it--check it where it is. If you're not using a foil pan, keep the crimp high to keep from losing liquid, uncrimp enough so that you can probe in a few places to feel the meat. (Note about how much liquid is in the foil, so you can select a proper sized container when it comes off.) Check in the usual center area, not the tip nor the point. It's OK to probe vertically. You want to probe to go in like it would in butter. If there's some resistance, remove the probe, reseal and cook another 30 min or so and check again.

    Remember, too, that since you're cooking higher you'll get good residual cooking after pulling. And if you are returning the brisket unfoiled to firm the bark, you will get further cooking. There is more leeway, finish-wise, with briskets cooked this way--if you go 30 min but the brisket needed 15 no problem.

    A 12-pounder will take between a bit over 2 hours to 2:40 in the foil.

    When it is time to pull the foiled brisket, get your liquids container ready and new foil. You will have scoped out the liquid quantity situation the first time you checked. If it seemed scant (not likely) have some chicken stock (or beef) ready. Carefully lift off the package and drain the juices into the container. You could have as much as 3 cups so be prepared.

    Now you have a choice. If you want to firm up the bark, return the brisket unfoiled to the smoker for about 30 minutes.

    **Resting

    When you are finally done cooking, wrap anew in doubled foil (or foil pan) and stick a good 1 1/2 cups of liquid back in there, unseparated. Separate and de-fat the remainder, if desired, for sauce.

    If you need to reduce excessive residual cooking, rest the brisket in opened foil on the counter or on top of the cooler for 5-10 minutes.

    Seal tightly, wrap in towels and rest in the vessel of your choice. Rest for an absolute minimum of 30 minutes, or a typical 1 to 2 hours. Towel wrapped and stored in a cooler, the brisket can be held for 3 hours or more, as long as the temperature does not drop below 140.

    **Storing Leftovers

    Brisket tastes great as leftovers, and it can be refrigerated safely for 3-4 days. The bark on brisket gets soft during storage and reheating. But the high heat method did not generate a strong bark to begin with, so that is less of a concern. Take care to not dry it out during reheating. A good method is to take brisket in zip bags with as much air removed as possible, and reheat them in simmering water. This limits the maximum temperature to 200 or so.

    Brisket freezes great in a zip bag (again, suck as much air out as possible). You can freeze chopped, sliced or unsliced. To reheat, you should thaw it first in the refrigerator. Then place the bag in simmering water until heated. You can take it straight from the freezer to simmering water until thawed and heated if you have to.

    Notes

    Questions, Todd D:
    1) Trim or don't trim? I've read some that say trim more aggressively than usual for low slow. Have also read don't trim anything.
    2) Previous briskets have used a little worcestershire and then the midnight brisket rub from the cooking section. Is that still acceptable on a HH cook, or do I need to move on and try a paste & rub combo?
    3) Should I get the smoker up to temp before placing the 2 briskets on? Concerned that cold ambient temps (probably in the 30s) along with 2 packers could delay the time to get up to temp. I normally cook with a Stoker.
    4) Should I swap briskets between top and bottom shelves when pulling out to foil?
    5) If resting in a towel lined cooler for an hour to two, would you return to fat side up during that rest?
    6) Is there much fat trimming that needs to be done after a HH brisket? Normally I have very little left on a low slow
    7) When probing for done, are you probing perpendicular to the meat, or coming in horizontally from the end?

    Answers, Craig Castille:
    1) I only trim in the cavity between the flat and the point. All else stays on until the end
    2) experiment with what you like. I use a paste as it adds a crusty flavor. Bark is a casualty of HH cooks.
    3) I'd get the fuel very engaged before assembly and putting the meat on. Once assembled, I'll leave the door off until temps get to 400. Then I'll play with the door or lid to maintain temps.
    4) Probably a good idea.
    5) I wouldn't turn it upside down if you use a paste. Keep in mind that the brisket will continue to cook if it's in a cooler. If you want to hold it for a couple of hours, then take it off just before tender or you may end up with pot roast.
    6) Fat depends on the brisket It's easier to remove after cooking.
    7) To check for tenderness, I insert the probe from the side.

    Answers, Kevin Kruger:
    1. I only trim the fat, some, in the cavity, like craig. Often I don't even do that. Depends on the brisket.
    2. I use a dry over paste. I like depth and breadth.
    3. I always Minion the start, using twice as much lit. In cold ambient temps I just up the lit. I prefer to have the meat cold and the cooker cold when I start. On virtually no cooks do I bring the cooktemp up first.
    4. I do.
    5. I don't. I don't cooler either. I rest 20-30 on the counter after draining most of the foil juices.
    6. I usually go with perpendicular, un the middles of the flat (not the middle of the packer).

    TVWBBQ Forum
     
  27. MR. COSELL

    MR. COSELL Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    C-West, thanks for the copy and paste. Anyway to get a good bark with this method? I am more of into dry rub.
     
  28. SouthernHorn

    SouthernHorn Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    At work we start the pit about 4:30 in the morning and have the brisket on by 5am and cook them at around 350. We wrap them at around 10 am then pull them off at 11am and let rest for about 30 min. We've done this several times here at work and they turn out just as good as slow cooked. And we usually cook a couple at a time.
     
  29. NormS

    NormS Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    FYI- I've seen Cali's brines at Academy.
     
  30. C-West

    C-West Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    Someone else would know better than I would since this is my first time trying this method. My gut tells me that this one isn't going to have that great of a bark because you spend a lot of time finishing it in foil. If I really wanted to, I could throw it back on the smoker after I unwrap it for a half hour to firm it up and get a better bark, but I think I'm going to just go with it right out of the foil this time around and adjust next time.

    I just poked it with a fork and it's almost there. Maybe another 30-45 minutes in foil, then I'll pull it, wrap it tightly in a couple layers of new foil, wrap it with a towel and let it sit in an ice chest for an hour or so.
     
  31. MR. COSELL

    MR. COSELL Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    Thanks C-West... keep us updated on taste, possible changes to process, etc.. would love to see some pics of that thing after you're done.. sliced as well if you have the time. Thanks..
     
  32. LONGHORNREALTOR

    LONGHORNREALTOR Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    After 180...gotta rely on the fork test
    If it goes through like a hot knife thru butter

    Its done

    sweet water spice brine are easier to find at Academy
     
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  33. ccatcher15

    ccatcher15 Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    Of course you're going to loose all bark after you foil it. You're also going to loose a lot of bark if you wrap it and put it in an ice chest too. If you unwrap it and put it back on the pit, it will bark back up a bit.
    This post was edited on 6/19 7:36 PM by ccatcher15
     
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  34. Hook'm RD

    Hook'm RD Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    I just did my brisket for 8 1/2 hours on a side firebox pit.(pecan)..it is the only Texan way to do it and the "high heat" stuff I am seeing is communist yankee influence. The key to moist is LET THEM REST before you cut them. Mine was so good it makes you eat your fingers.
     
  35. C-West

    C-West Well-Known Member
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    Re: High Heat Brisket

    Guys... a little part of me died tonight. It was better than the best brisket I've ever done low and slow. It's gonna be hard for me to go back. Even the flat was moist as hell. I prefer more of a bark but I think I could just throw it back on the smoker at the end to achieve that next time.

    Anyway, I'm very surprised but the high heat method made me a believer today. I feel a little dirty saying that, but it's the truth.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    This post was edited on 6/19 9:57 PM by C-West
     
  36. cochbawls

    cochbawls You play to win the game
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  37. Okie4horns

    Okie4horns Well-Known Member
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    Looks great
     
  38. hrsepwr

    hrsepwr Well-Known Member
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    Damn! That thing looks good!
     
  39. RealUT

    RealUT Well-Known Member
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    Wow...look at that ring. Nice job.
     
  40. frlush

    frlush Well-Known Member
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    Good work!
     
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